Nov. 23, 2022

Community, Collaboration, and Education- Three Years of Chefs Without Restaurants

Community, Collaboration, and Education- Three Years of Chefs Without Restaurants

Thank you for three years and 100,000 downloads. This week marks the three-year anniversary of the podcast, and last week we hit 100,000 total downloads, so I thought I'd do something a little different. This is a re-post of the first podcast episode. The show was co-founded with Andrew Wilkinson of Pizza Llama, and back then, Andrew took on much of the hosting duties. He was with the show for the first four months.

On the show, Andrew and I talk about the foundations of Chefs Without Restaurants: community, collaboration, and education. We discuss our aspirations for the community and podcast. Most of it has remained, though some things have changed. I'd love your feedback. What's working? What do you love? Where can we improve? Feel free to email me at chefswithoutrestaurants@gmail.com or send an Instagram DM @Chefswithoutrestaurants

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Sponsor- The United States Personal Chef Association
Over the past 30 years, the world of the personal chef has grown in importance to fulfill dining needs. While the pandemic certainly upended the restaurant experience, it allowed personal chefs to close that dining gap.  Central to all of that is the United States Personal Chef Association.
 
USPCA provides a strategic backbone for those chefs that includes liability insurance, training, communications, certification, and more. It’s a reassurance to consumers that the chef coming into their home is prepared to offer them an experience with their meal.

Call Angela today at 800-995-2138 ext 705 or email her at aprather@uspca.com for membership and partner info.

Sponsor-meez
Still keeping your recipes in docs? Doing your costing in spreadsheets? You should try meez—the recipe tool designed for chefs by chefs. Founded by professional chef Josh Sharkey, meez transforms your recipe content into a powerful digital format that lets you organize, scale, train, and cost like never before. See why meez is loved by over 12,000 culinary professionals. Sign up for a free account today at getmeez.com/cwr. 

Transcript
Chris Spear:

Three years and 100,000 downloads. Thank you so much. This is Chris spear. And I'm the host of Chefs Without Restaurants, the program where I speak with culinary entrepreneurs and people working in the food and beverage industry outside of a traditional restaurant setting. So last week, this show hit 100,000 downloads. And today, or was it yesterday was the third anniversary of the show. So this week, I'm doing something a little different. I know have some hardcore fans out there. And you've listened to a lot of the shows many of you have been with us since the start. But I'm sure there are tons of you who have not gone back all the way to Episode One. I know it makes it really hard to go scrolling all the way back down through 170 episodes. We've come a long way. This show started out with a co host, although I actually would even argue that maybe Andrew Wilkinson was the actual host of the show when we started. Andrew is the owner and head pizza slinger of pizza llama a mobile woodfired pizza operation based in Frederick Maryland here. And if you didn't know, he and I actually started the show together. So instead of bringing you a new episode this week, I thought it'd be really fun to repost our original episode. Now, please bear with me, especially if you're very new to the show, we have come so far, we didn't know anything about audio engineering, volume leveling, noise reduction, any of that I did try and clean this episode up a little bit. But I wanted to keep the content of the conversation the same, I didn't want to go back and edit it, even though sometimes it's a little painful to listen to. But we talked about what the values missions and goals of Chefs Without Restaurants was when we set out. And we talked a lot about a commitment to culture and community and collaboration and education. So I put this to you, if you know me, this organization, this podcast, do you feel that that's what this is still all about? Give me your comments and your feedback, I would love to hear it. And if you didn't know about Andrew, he was with me from the beginning of the show in November 2019. Up until the start of COVID. He's awesome. He and I still talk and hang out. He still cooks with me. Just situations and circumstances. He stepped away from the podcast, and I took it over solo in March of 2020. It was a lot of fun for me to go back and listen to this episode while I was putting this together. So I hope you enjoy it. And again, thank you so much. It is really mind blowing to me that the show has been downloaded over 100,000 times. That's really crazy. I mean, on the show, I joke that I wanted to have millions of listeners, but I really had no idea that in three years, I would hit this benchmark. And in this episode, we talk financials, you know, the reality is I need income, and especially to keep the show going. One of the ways we do that is through our sponsorships. So if you go to chefs without restaurants.com forward slash sponsors, you can get all the sponsor info there, including our affiliate partners that we're working with. But one of the main income sources is my host read sponsor ads. So before the episode, you're going to hear a word from this week's sponsors. I really appreciate you listening to him, supporting them. And if you want to be a sponsor get in contact with me. It's currently the end of November and I'm trying to finalize annual sponsors for next year. So reach out chefswithoutrestaurants@gmail.com If that's something you're interested in, I hope you your family and friends have an amazing Thanksgiving. And I will talk to you again soon have a great one.

USPCA AD:

Over the past 30 years, the world of the personal chef has grown in importance to fulfill those dining needs. While the pandemic certainly up ended the restaurant experience it allowed personal chefs to close that dining gap. Central to all of that is the United States personal chef Association, representing nearly 1000 chefs around the US and Canada. USPCA provides a strategic backbone to those chefs that includes liability insurance, training, communications, certification and more. It's a reassurance to consumers that the chef coming into their home is prepared to offer them an experience with their meal. USPCA provides training to become a personal chef through our preparatory membership. Looking to showcase your products or services to our chefs and their clients. partnership opportunities are available. Call Angela today at 1-800-995-2138 extension 705 or email her at aprather@uspca.com. For membership and partner info.

meez Ad:

Are you still keeping your recipes and docs doing your costing and spreadsheets? Well you should try meez, the recipe tool designed for chefs by chefs founded by professional chef Josh Sharkey. Meez transforms your recipe content into a powerful digital format that lets you organize scale train and cost like never before. See why meez is loved by over 12,000 culinary professionals sign up for a free account at get At gmail.com forward slash Chefs Without Restaurants, that's gtmez.com forward slash Chefs Without Restaurants. And on a personal note, I've been using mes almost daily. I wish I had this tool years ago, the ability to quickly scale a recipe up or down, or to search across all recipes for single ingredient like pumpkin. And if you really want to get an in depth breakdown, I had Muse founder Josh Sharkey on the podcast a few months ago. That was episode 155, released in July of 2020. So go check it out to find out what MES is all about.

Andrew Wilkinson:

What's up, y'all, we're here. I'm Andrew.

Chris Spear:

This is Chris.

Andrew Wilkinson:

And this is going to be our pre official first episode of the Chefs Without Restaurants podcast. This is like a preliminary episode just to kind of let everybody in, it's actually going to be more of a conversation between me and Chris to figure out exactly what our goals mission and values for this podcast are going to be. We decided to just kind of wing it and figure that out along the way. So we're going to start the documentation of those things. Right here, right now, today, if you're listening to this, maybe in a week or two, you'll be able to listen to our very first podcast where we interview each other. But this is just kind of, to let everybody know what we're doing.

Chris Spear:

We're gonna kinda put it out there, I think a lot of you, if you're listening probably have some familiarity with us both personally, and the Chefs Without Restaurants group. But if you're a new listener, and I hope we're gonna have 1000s, maybe millions of new listeners out there, we're going to kind of let you know what this is all about.

Andrew Wilkinson:

So I guess we should start by talking about Chefs Without Restaurants and what that is all about. And I think that you, Chris, are probably a little more well suited to do that. Yeah, you are the founder of Chefs Without Restaurants.

Chris Spear:

So I have a personal chef business called perfect little bites, I bring the restaurant experience into my customers homes. I started that as a side gig about 10 years ago. And I've been doing it full time for three years now. But I found that there weren't a lot of resources for what I was doing. I mean, there's a personal chefs Association. And I actually joined them, probably about seven years ago, took their class, there's a lot of information. But it didn't really fit with what I wanted to be doing. So I started to blaze my own path. And in the process, I found a lot of success as a personal chef. And people started asking me to tell my story. I did a bunch of podcasts, interviews with other people. And I kept kind of saying that same things over and over. But what else came out of it was, I found that I needed some resources that weren't out there, people to bounce ideas off of questions to ask them, something that is huge for me now is, you know, I don't have employees for my business. So how can I find people to work for me, and I thought I'd very informally have a group, mostly through social media, people in the DC metro area that I could rely on, we could help each other out, share jobs quite often, you know, I'll be booked on Saturday night, and a customer would say, Hey, can you come work? Do a dinner for me on Saturday? And I'd have to say, sorry, I'm booked. But then I thought, well, you know, I've started to get a lot of friends who are doing this, why shouldn't I be sharing the jobs with them. So I thought I was gonna create something super informal, where I could kind of share jobs with friends, and vice versa. And Chefs Without Restaurants was born out of that. And I can get into the name of that in a little bit. But I thought it was going to be just a handful of people. And then I talked about it on my personal Facebook page, and just said, Hey, I'm starting this thing, Chefs Without Restaurants. Here's what it's all about. And I'm friends with Laura Hayes, who writes the food column for the DC City Paper. And I think that afternoon, she messaged me and said, I think you've got something here. And I'd like to talk about it this Thursday. So could you hopped on a call tomorrow, and I did. And then it went to print. And then by the weekend, we had like 200 people follow the Facebook page. And that's when I realized that there was something here that was bigger than just me and like three people I knew.

Andrew Wilkinson:

And it's been helpful to me just to have that page to go to, like see what people are posting to chime in on discussions and stuff. Yeah, hopefully along with like some listenership. Hopefully we can grow that platform as well. Yeah. And

Chris Spear:

so one of the things for me is also that I feel a lot of these resources can be free and should be free. For me, it's kind of like sticking it back to the man because there's these platforms like thumbtack, you know, and I still use them somewhat. But that's a platform where people can come on and customers and say they're looking for a chef. And here's the details. And if you want to get in front of that customer, you send them an email and it costs anywhere from 30 to $100 to get a lead. And even if it doesn't pan out, you still paid the money. And we have enough chefs in our group that I think we can be sharing these for free, you know the platform without the chef's, there is no platform. And I think you can just share the love. So if I can't do a gig on Saturday night, it doesn't hurt me to send the job to a peer, whether it's someone I know personally, or just someone within our group who maybe I've never even met without saying to them, okay, but pay me 30 bucks or give me a percentage of that. And that's what I wanted was to build this network where we could kind of do a lot of that in house, this is a group that there's no official membership, you don't have to apply. There's no cost or fee. I don't charge an annual or monthly membership. I'm not looking for any money out of gigs, I just say, you know, contribute to the group, share your knowledge, share resources help one another. And that's kind of what I'm looking to get at it. So this is not something that I've currently monetized. I mean, yes, I'm looking long term at ways to monetize, but I want to keep it free for the chef's. So that's the balance that we're trying to walk right now.

Andrew Wilkinson:

I know we talked about this already today. of audio, I guess there was a term that you use, we actually already went through this already.

Chris Spear:

Was it food businesses or independent food businesses, independent, independent operators,

Andrew Wilkinson:

because we're not trying to have a narrow scope, like this podcast in this resource isn't just for personal chefs. It's not just for a food truck operator, you know, I think what we're trying to target is someone who is who could be a personal chef who could be a food truck operator, who, even though it's called Chefs, Without Restaurants might have a dream to open their restaurant, but you have to start somewhere, you have to be somewhere at some point where you are a chef without a restaurant. And, you know, I guess the whole purpose behind all this is to leave our our print on that on the world, on the world on the industry, you know what I mean? And kind of like, push it into a better direction. So I guess if we can influence any of those people, whether they're opening a restaurant or trying to be a personal chef, or be in a food truck, that we can push the industry in a direction that's beneficial to all of us, through our listeners and members of the group.

Chris Spear:

Yeah, the entrepreneurial spirit. So one of the things is, I live in Frederick, Maryland, I'm not from here. I've grown up and lived in bigger cities where there seemed to be a food community. And I moved here, and there's a lot of restaurants and I thought there are going to be so many cool chefs who want to do events together, network have a good time, I could be mistaken. But I have not found that community. This is a owner driven community of food establishments and not shaft driven. So you know, there's a lot of discussions about, you know, ROI, and dollars and cents of things. And there weren't a lot of chefs who wanted to hang out and network and help each other out. And then I found this group of personal chefs, caterers, food truck operators, but extending that to people like sharing it all in one basket, which is a specialty store where she sells vinegars and olive oils, and spices and stuff. You know, she's not a chef. It's not a restaurant, but she's an entrepreneur, she has her own food business, you know, I want to support her, I've done events with her, you know, bringing people like that into the group. You have restaurants like roast house pub with Chef Nico, who is amazing, one of my favorite chats here, he's been very supportive of me the group, but I think a lot of that comes down to he is the chef owner of his business, he's not part of a larger Restaurant Group, you know, so he's still fighting the same challenges that I think we as small food entrepreneurs have. So for me, it was more connecting with people who understand the challenge of owning and running your own small food business. So yeah, you know, we extend that out to also some small, smaller restaurants,

Andrew Wilkinson:

I think at a deeper level, really what it's about, it's about culture, you know, like, who, you know, you hear a lot about company culture, and like business culture a lot now. So like, I guess, something that I think it would be cool to tackle is just like, industry culture, and people are trying to change that already. That's already a thing. But you know, like, in our niche, and what we do, and who we think we can influence and bring value to, I think impacting that aspect of the industry. And developing that culture is, is definitely a worthy goal.

Chris Spear:

And I didn't have a lot of mentors, physically, like in the kitchen. Like there weren't a lot of chefs, I actually worked with who I would consider mentors, but on the rise of the Internet, you know, I think there are some really great chefs who I am super appreciative, who helped me out or you know, would interact with me. So, you know, I grew up in a time when you'd work for a chef, and they had secret recipes, right? Like they wouldn't even tell our cooks what was in a dish, because they were afraid they were going to go open up a rival clam chowder restaurant, which is ridiculous. But then I've been on say Twitter for like 10 years and you have these really great chefs like Alex of ideas and food or Dave Arnold of cooking issues. And guys who are doing really cool stuff who are essentially open books, you could ask them any question and they would answer to read, or they just would interact with you. And I really loved that about the food internet, especially starting about 10 years ago. And I just, I liked that idea of community of not seeing each other as competitors, but seeing each other as peers and helping each other out. And I missed that, you know, I was working for Sodexo, and I had 100 employees in the kitchen. So if I made a dish, you know, I could bounce it off of sous chefs chef to cuisines, dishwashers, everyone and get feedback. And now it's kind of an echo chamber where I worked by myself every day. So I wanted to have a community, and not necessarily for people to taste my dishes, but just you know, sometimes you just want to shoot someone a text and say, like, hey, what do you think about this, or, you know, let's do an event together, because I miss cooking with people. So I just wanted to have this thing where I could, you know, maybe get out of my solo kitchen environment and hang out with other like minded people working in the food world. I wrote down

Andrew Wilkinson:

before we started recording, you know, just a couple of sections. It was like goals, values and mission, you know, I feel like that's kind of like the driving force behind what we're doing. And if we set that out clear, we can go so much further, if we know where we're where we're heading. So I guess, just real quick, jotted down some words for the values that I know I hold and that Chris has expressed. And that's culture, strong culture in this industry community, which is exactly what the Chefs Without Restaurants group is about collaboration, which is the spirit in which Chefs Without Restaurants exists because of the lack thereof, kind of in the industry in our town. And we want to educate So education is a value. We want Chefs Without Restaurants, the group and the podcast to be somewhere where people can get educated, whether it be, you know, even just down to who their peers are in the industry, or, you know, best practices.

Chris Spear:

Yeah, I'm sharing resources. There's a chef who reached out to me via Instagram a couple of weeks ago, and he's someone who I've been Facebook friends with for a long time. And I don't know him personally. But he's trying to get a personal chef thing going. And he was asking about kind of like how I interact with my customers. So I have a lot of templates, template emails, templates, for poll sheets, when I go do an event, there's a questionnaire that I have every customer fill out, where I collect their data, you know, their their name, their address, their budget, what they like, and don't like, I've already done the work for that, if you need that, I will share it with you. So I sent him an email with that. So you don't have to reinvent the wheel, like I have no problem saying, Yep, this is what I give a potential customer and have them fill out here, take my file, make changes to it as you see fit. I think there should be more of that. Like, I'd love to have a database of templates, emails, things like that, that we can all share. Because we shouldn't have to start from

Andrew Wilkinson:

scratch, I can benefit from all that stuff. I've been running my business off of kind of just, you know, I'm not the most organized person. So

Chris Spear:

yeah, I'm not either. It's tough luck. I believe that ADHD coming in. And it's been a challenge, a blessing and a curse and not having a boss to hold me accountable. So I have to hold myself accountable to myself. And I'm kind of a free spirit. And I'd rather get up and just do the thing. And I've had to put these kinds of things in place to keep me on track.

Andrew Wilkinson:

Well, that's hilarious that you mentioned that because that segues perfectly into the next value that I wrote down, which is accountability, whether it's accountability for ourselves, as independent food operators, or accountability for the industry as a whole. You know, we're trying to shift this thing for the better and so that everybody can benefit from it. And you know, they say all boats rise with the tide. So I think we need to hold each other accountable so that we're not one holding each other back or, you know, everybody's just doing their part. And then the last value, I think, which is doesn't even need to be said, but it's just about quality food. We definitely want to inspire people to do what they do the best and make the best things they can and use the best ingredients they can, while hopefully supporting local farmers in such in the process. Of course, it's not always the easiest thing to do. But it's definitely something we need to put effort into to shift this industry into something great. Those are the values and then I just jotted this down a second ago while we were while you were talking. Here's what I have for a mission so far. You tell me if you want to edit it, you know, this is and this is ongoing like this might change in a month. This might change right now, it might change in a year from now. But I think it's important just to have it so the Chefs Without Restaurants podcast is an audio resource for independent food operators to be inspired and shift the industry to enrich every person involved and affected by it.

Chris Spear:

That's super eloquent.

Andrew Wilkinson:

I might be a good writer, maybe if I can get some long format writing down I maybe you know I can do some pizza today articles or something.

Chris Spear:

You're way more organized about the business that I started, you know, I like I like, I like how you've articulated this.

Andrew Wilkinson:

Maybe that's my strength. I've been thinking about this a lot lately. What am I actually good at? You know, and maybe we can help people with this too. I obviously have drive and goals that I work towards. And what do you call that when you like, you're motivated to do stuff? Motivation? Yeah, that but there's another word that I'm searching for. But anyway, I think a lot of that is like, what am I actually good at? What's gotten me through four years in my business? Like, what's gotten me to where I am at today? What's what's got me to the point where I believe in myself enough to do what I do and be my own boss, and, you know, like, or anything, that's not work related, but like, what, what are you good at as a person, sometimes it's hard to like, pinpoint and pick those things. And I guess, from what I've learned from other people is that like you, you just have to try things and like, do different stuff to learn things about yourself. And that's how you figure it out. And I think like articulating this stuff, maybe that's one of my strengths was just, even in my own head if I'm not speaking it, but just articulating what my ideas and what ideas and possibilities that I could like, get a dream for. I think it's formulas,

Chris Spear:

I think it's interesting, because I've always self identified as an introvert, I have a lot of people telling me like, You're not an introvert, like you do all these podcasts, like you're getting out there. And there's a difference between being an introvert and being shy. But, you know, having my own business, I didn't study business in school, I went to school for culinary. And then it was you broke out on your own, it's like, well, you have to be a marketer, right? So it's like, I'm making videos on Tiktok. Like, I don't care how I look. You know, it's just like, I've had to grow my business, I've had to get out there. And that means like, writing, blogging, networking, marketing, and in the process, I've really enjoyed it. I've enjoyed this, the process of building community of talking to people, I just think I grew up with, like, I didn't like the people I grew up with, like my hometown, and I was an art sky, kind of in a sports town and just didn't find my tribe. So I didn't feel like I had a voice. And then you meet, like, really cool, like minded people. And you realize, like, Oh, I'm not really shy, or whatever. I just, you know, what I had to say, the people around me didn't want to hear what I had to say. So building a community that I wanted to be a part of, and giving this group room to grow it, it's a little different for different people, we have people who consistently come on to the Facebook page and just say, hey, you know, I'm doing an event on Saturday, and I need someone to work on my food truck, like that's what they get out of it. I have other people who want to come in and want resources, such as email templates, and then other people who just want to come on and bounce culinary ideas. So I've given it a lot of leeway. So it's hard to articulate quickly, in an elevator speech when people say like, what is Chefs Without Restaurants and who's it for, because it's a little different for everyone. And then we have the two sides. It's for the chef's, but it's also a resource for customers, you know, we're building a database of chef's. So when you come on as a customer, you know, I'm hoping to be able to get you whether you need a food truck for your event, or a personal chef, like myself for a small dinner or a caterer for 200 person wedding. Like I want to be able to find that for you. So there's kind of a dual purpose. You know, we're a b2b organization, but we're a b2c organization as well.

Andrew Wilkinson:

Definitely.

Chris Spear:

Yeah, yeah. After that, like, seriously, I do have a couple things that are cooking, that I'm not even remotely close to blasting out there. But I would love to have an app, if there's any awesome app developers. I mean, there's a lot of apps, you know, like, thumbtack has an app where you can go on as a customer and put in a gig and all that stuff. Shout out to thumbtack for the low price of starting at $2 million, you can buy Chefs Without Restaurants, and I'll shut it down and go start something else just thought it mentioned, I'll take a couple million. But there are a lot of great opportunities out there. And I think that this thing could potentially grow into ways that I even haven't even thought about, especially as we bring more members into the group, and just kind of see, you know, I'm going to consistently be auditing where we're at what people are getting value in. But I just think this, the podcast itself is really cool. Because I get to sit and talk to people, I really like a

Andrew Wilkinson:

huge portion of the guests on the show or people that are part of the group or maybe just people that we would love to be part of the

Chris Spear:

group and the effort to provide value. You know, I think maybe you have a food photographer on and you can talk about food photography or something or, you know, it might be someone in marketing, you know, all the things that we're not maybe good at or have a lot of experience and bring in these auxilary businesses.

Andrew Wilkinson:

i The only thing that I have written down that we haven't gone over as goals and I actually don't have any written down because I think that's kind of ties in with the mission and values.

Chris Spear:

I think the mission and values are the goals, you know, just to continue educating, supporting building community. If you stay true to the pillars of that, you know, I'm all about no drama. You sometimes have to walk The line between thoughtful disagreements and drama, you know, I don't want someone to try my food and say it's not good. But I'm fully have the mindset that if I make something and you try it and you think it could be better or need something, I'm open to that, I'd love to see that, you know, if I go to the pizza truck, and have a slice of Andrew's delicious pizza, maybe if I'm feeling that it's a little too salty, or a little too, something, you know, I want to be able to say, hey, you know, good pie, but I felt it was a little salty, and that he's not gonna get all testy about it, and that I can talk about that I think that's, that's a big thing. That's something I was trying to teach my cooks who worked for me is that they should be tasting each other's food, and critiquing it thoughtfully, before it even got to me to try it. And hopefully, we can do that with each other.

Andrew Wilkinson:

First time I came in cooking with you, I was kind of like, I didn't know what to expect. But there was just a level of like, autonomy there, like, and I realized, because it's like, you wouldn't have asked me if you didn't think that I was capable. And with that, you're just like, alright, you do this? And I'm like, Well, should I be asking a bunch of questions, or maybe he's just letting me do my thing. And customers are

Chris Spear:

normal people, I think it's easy to default that the chef only has his sous chef or chef de cuisine or something tastes his food. But you also have to think that a customer might have a less trained palate, for lack of a better term, you know, I'm all about giving my 16 year old dishwasher and a restaurant some food to try and get their opinion, because they would maybe be a typical customer and see what they think, and not come out with a very Sheffy kind of opinion. But yeah, giving giving employees autonomy, you know, I was running a big operation with 100 plus employees. And I didn't want to be married to that job and have to be there all the time. Like you have to trust that the people working for you or with you can can do the job on their own. I've always wanted to just train people really well, but teach them how to kind of go off on their own riff on their own and not be concerned about minor little tweaks and adjustments, like Andrew could come on a gig with me, and I could say, Make this Vinagrette. And I try it, and maybe it wouldn't be 100% The way I do it, but it's probably gonna be like 90% or above. And rather than micromanaging that situation, I can go fast, and we can still put out a an awesome product, even if it's not 100% The way I would have done it and then

Andrew Wilkinson:

critique me on the back end. Chris has a point here, and it really comes down to like ego, you know, he's he built a little opportunity, you know, I'm helping him out. And he's given me an opportunity to learn some of these things, or just do something different and get some experience. And, you know, if he had so much ego involved as to like, throw this whole vinaigrette away, because it was 95% and not 100, or even like 85 or 75% and not 100. Like, honestly, a 75% to us cooks could be super delicious to a consumer. And they won't even know the difference just like Oh, this isn't here's how I want to taste it. But somebody who you're just giving it to is going to be like, this is the best that I've ever had.

Chris Spear:

My wife gut checks me all the time, she used to be a chef, and she comes out on gigs. And like, she'll just say like, it doesn't matter. like nobody's gonna notice that, like, I know, you notice that. But they're not going to notice that. And that's kind of the way I have to think about it with with my business. So I think we could all do a little more of that, like letting go just a little bit that you know, it's going to be good enough.

Andrew Wilkinson:

So what I did here for these goals is I basically, I have columns, there's the values on the right side and goals on the left side. And it worked out super nicely. Because what you said about the values, and the goals being are the values and the missions being the goals? Well, really, I think, I think the that the goals and the values kind of encompass what the mission is. And even though the mission doesn't state all these goals and values worked out nicely, because I pretty much just added verbs, verbs and maybe an adjective or two, under the goals next to the values. So I'm going to repeat the values with words in front of them to tell you our goals. And the goals are to build culture, to organize community, to encourage collaboration, to always be educating or being educated. So always learn uphold accountability, and to promote the quality of

Chris Spear:

food. Yeah, that sounds amazing.

Andrew Wilkinson:

Sounds pretty good to me. I think we're gonna run with it. That might change a little bit too. But

Chris Spear:

so we want to hear from you like, what are you interested in? Why are you here? Why are you listening? Why do you want to be a member, an active member of our community? What can you bring to the table? What do you not really interested in? That maybe we've gotten into in the past? And how can we help you?

Andrew Wilkinson:

Yeah, definitely, if you can, if you hear something on here and you're like, that doesn't matter. I don't give a shit. Your opinion might be very valid to a lot of people. So let us know that or let us know. The things that we mentioned that you feel are very important and maybe we can try to lay I make it a point to really focus on those, you know. So definitely reach out to us, you can either you can hit me up personally or Chris, he's perfect, perfect little bites. And I'm a free PCA. And you can also hit up the Chefs Without Restaurants, Instagram, Facebook, whatever.

Chris Spear:

So there's two. Right now there's a chefs without restaurants.com. And there's a chefs without restaurants.org. And I own them both. the.org is almost, it's really just like a landing page that I've maximized for mobile. So when you go to the Chefs Without Restaurants, Instagram, instead of having a paid link tree, I just did it myself as a WordPress page, so you can still go to it on a desktop. But really, it's just to highlight different members and have different links and stuff that are relevant that looks good on a mobile platform, but you can communicate to us by either their Chefs Without Restaurants, sites, social media super quick, you can send me a DM on Instagram or the Facebook page or group.

Andrew Wilkinson:

Do that and go ahead and rate and review this episode. If you're excited about this podcast, I know we're really excited to give you these episodes with our esteemed guests, and colleagues. And our first ever episode will probably air sometime in December. It's just me and Chris, you can get to know us. And you know, we're gonna get into the format of the episodes and stuff like that. But yeah, definitely. In the meantime, just just stay posted. Stay updated. Definitely reach out to us with any questions, concerns or comments you have. And again, we're super excited to bring you Chefs Without Restaurants podcast, which is an audio resource for independent food operators to be inspired and shift the industry to enrich every person involved and affected by it. Quick Instagram

Chris Spear:

plug if you are on Instagram, and you should be on Instagram, when you post a photo with your food. Use both the hashtag Chefs Without Restaurants and you can tag the business in there and they'll show up in the feed. And I'm trying to be good about reposting those photos and stuff too. So the fastest way to get free publicity and reposted is to use both the hashtag and the tagging.

Andrew Wilkinson:

All right, everybody. Have a great day. A great week. Great month. We love you and you'll be hearing from us. Thank you for listening.

Chris Spear:

Thank you. Go to chefs without restaurants.org To find our Facebook group, mailing list and check database. The community is free to join. You'll get gig opportunities, advice on building and growing your business and you'll never miss an episode of our podcast. Have a great week.